Ivan Levynskyi

1851-1918
ID: 1

Ivan Levynskyi is one of the most interesting figures in Lviv's history of architecture and urban development in the early 20th c. He was born on 6 July 1851 in the Galician town of Dolyna near Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk). In 1875 he graduated from the Lviv Polytechnic and opened his own architectural bureau soon, a company for producing building materials and a ceramic studio. From 1903 he was a professor and taught architecture at the Lviv Polytechnic.

Levynskyi was a member of several associations organized by Galician Ruthenians — Prosvita, Silskyi Hospodar, Student Society Osnova; he was a patron of the Workers' Educational Society Postup, and member of the People's Museum Council.

Deported by Russians to Kyiv in 1914, along with numerous Polish intellectuals, Levynskyi founded the Agrarian Technical Society Pratsia and built a Catholic church in the Hutsul style in Kyiv. On returning to Lviv in 1918 he fell ill and died.


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Works and Projects

Levynskyi designed and built numerous Lviv buildings in a style which combined Viennese Secession with Carpathian folk architecture motifs. The most interesting are, in particular, the buildings of the Chamber of Commerce, the Dnister Association, the Academic House, and the Asnyka (now Bohomoltsia) street ensemble. He also designed and built hospitals and sanatoriums in Lviv, Horodenka, Kolomyia, Ternopil, Vorokhta, Zalishchyky, and Zolochiv. In 1917 he built a Catholic church in the Hutsul style in Kyiv.

Sources

Sources:

  1. "Levynsky, Ivan," Encyclopedia of Ukraine, Vol. 3 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993).
  2. See also article on Levynsky in the Ukrainian weekly 26 (1996)
  3. "Ornament Is Not a Crime: Art Nouveau in the architecture of Lviv, Ukraine"  (exhibition by Ihor Zhuk in the Ukrainian Museum, New York)
  4. Олесь Нога, Іван Левинський: художник, архітектор, промисловець, педаґоґ, громадський діяч (Львів: Основа, 1993).
  5. Іван Олексин, Життя і діяльність Івана Левинського: Іван Левинський, його життя та праця (Львів: Аґрономічно-технічне товариство “Праця”, 1934), 9-22.
  6. Ігор Жук, Іван Левинський, архітектор-будівничийЛьвова, Архітектура України (Київ, 1992).
  7. Матеріал з Вікіпедії
Written by Markian Prokopovych